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Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

Here’s the problem — with so much information to consume we often fall into a predictable trap.

It goes like this.

You come across something insightful in a podcast, a book, or a blog post. Inspired, you start thinking about how this might apply to the challenges that you are facing and the life that you want to create. You glance at the idea and its application.

And then, your thought process is interrupted by the continuous stream of information assaulting your senses.

When we think in glances, we think that real learning has happened.

But it hasn’t.

For example, people hear about the 80/20 principle, do a 30-second calculation in their heads, and then think that they effectively applied the idea. …


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Photo by Gift Habeshaw on Unsplash

One of the most inspiring moments of my life happened a couple of years ago.

I was a physio working with a patient in intensive care who had been the victim of a hijacking. She was shot 5 times and one of those bullets fractured her jaw.

In surgery her jaw was repaired and immobilized. Meaning that her mouth was literally wired shut.

Yet, she still managed to crack a smile.

Signaling that she was still here and ready to fight, to get better.

And guess what, it’s really easy to help someone who want to help themselves.

She recovered amazingly well. …


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Photo by Adrien Converse on Unsplash

The best way to improve your life in 2021 is to become comfortable with uncertainty.

The fear of the unknown often takes up so much of your bandwidth that you have little energy left to execute the habits and behaviors that produce a meaningful and productive life.

So, the question then is how do you become comfortable with uncertainty?

I can think of three things:

1. Look back at your life and realize that you have never had certainty and that life is non-linear to the core. When I deeply internalized this belief it changed me. What it does is take the sting and surprise out of random events. Why? …


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Photo by Jr Korpa on Unsplash

Do it again and again. Consistency makes the raindrops to create holes in the rock. Whatever is difficult can be done easily with regular attendance, attention, and action. — Israelmore Ayivor

I am not here to persuade you that consistency is the key to success. I suspect that you have heard that maxim countless times before.

What I do want you to think about is that consistency is a promise that you make to yourself about how you want to show up in the world.

It’s important to keep promises.

Especially the ones you make to yourself.

The more you break your promises, the less you trust yourself. The less you trust yourself, the less you do, and the more you doubt whether you have what it takes. …


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Photo by Jr Korpa on Unsplash

Tim Gallwey taught us that every game consists of two parts.

The outer game is played in the external environment.

For leaders, it’s the challenge of transitioning to a remote workforce, or attaining certain performance goals, or adapting to changing technologies.

The inner game is about how you navigate and improve your inner world.

For leaders, it’s dealing with the fear of the unknown, the doubt of whether you have what it takes to lead in a new world, the judgment when you fail to make the right decision.

Most leaders spend too much time trying to control the outer game and too little time trying to master the inner game. …


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Photo by Dylan Ferreira on Unsplash

Remote leadership is not nearly as easy as it might seem at first glance.

Many leaders recently learned that leading a team through the screen of your computer requires a completely new way of thinking and doing. It has meant learning new skills, adapting a new approach to performance measurement, and grappling with the fault lines in our teams.

Here are 5 things that great remote leaders don’t do.

1. Don’t Spy On Their People

Going remote meant that leaders experienced the true meaning of trusting their teams.

The question I have been asked the most over the past few months has been, “Now that I can’t see my people, how do I know they are doing what they are supposed to be doing?” Unfortunately, many leaders responded to this situation by finding ways to monitor and surveil their team. This means screenshots of what people are working on, strict time clocking sheets, and even gps tracking. …


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The hardest part…

is waiting.

The biggest mistake…

is thinking that waiting is a passive practice.

The best thing you can do…

is to move forward.

Every day. Every moment. Every interaction.

The future will reward you for it.

Acta non verba,
Erik

About

Erik Kruger

International Keynote Speaker | Executive Coach | Author. Writing about leadership & mastery. http://erikkruger.com

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